Hidden stories of the South Asian community

The Vancouver Perspectives will be hosting Cultural Landscapes: Vancouver’s South Asian Community Nov. 26, 2017. The panel will trace the story of Vancouver’s South Asian community from the very first migrants over a century ago until the present day, uncovering and illuminating stories that may have been overlooked or hidden from the majority of the…

A glimpse at Nordic living

Vancouver is known to be a prominent hub for nurturing various cultures and traditions, including the heritage of Scandinavians. On Nov. 26, the Scandinavian Centre will be holding the Scandinavian Craft Fair. There will be vendors, Scandinavian merchandise and lunch at the event. The craft fair is open to the public or anyone who’s interested…

Lived experiences of interned Japanese Canadians

This past summer, Universal Limited theatre members Yoshié Bancroft, Joanna Garfinkel and their team have been performing a historical re-enactment of the 1942 Japanese-Canadian internment at Hastings Park in Vancouver to remember the stories of those interned there, preserve that history and draw attention to similar events happening now. Their next live performance will be…

‘Islamophobia is intertwined with sexism’

Canada, often regarded as an inclusive, multicultural haven, has increasingly been the scene of a series of hate crimes against Muslims. This Islamophobia is concerning and based on misperceptions about Muslim people, according to Itrath Syed, PhD candidate in the School of Communication at SFU. She will give a public lecture on Gendered Islamophobia and Muslim…

Underrepresented youth tell their stories

DisPLACEment, a media arts program run by the Access to Media Education Society (AMES), looks to give young people in marginalized communities the platform and support that they need to tell their stories. Founded over 20 years ago, the Access to Media Education Society’s goal is to provide access to media training and technology for…

Vancouver’s Black Community honours a missing page of history

With the removal of the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts approaching, Hogan’s Alley Trust, a community-led nonprofit, along with the Western Front, an artist-run centre, is hosting conversations (Oct. 24 and Nov. 21) to honour Hogan’s Alley, then-hub of Vancouver’s Black community. Hogan’s Alley, where Vancouver’s Black community thrived, was bulldozed in the 1970s to make…

A walk in Maillardville

As part of their Culture Days celebrations Mackin House & Fraser Mills Station will be offering a walking tour of historic Maillardville in Coquitlam on Oct. 1. Maillardville was settled by French- Canadians in the early 1900s. “Coquitlam Heritage offers these walking tours so that members of the community can find out more about the…

A gathering to spotlight Maya spirituality

Avexnim Cojti wants to raise awareness about Maya, a long-practiced spirituality before the Spanish colonizers came to Guatemala. In Guatemala, a territory that had once nurtured Maya for thousands of years, many Guatemalans are devout Catholics. Yet Cojti represents one of the few who practice Maya. “I’m not saying mine is better than theirs. All…

A Scotsman in China

On Sept. 28, at Simon Fraser University, Professor Marilyn Bowman will share the story of James Legge, a 19th century Scotsman who set off to China as a missionary and not only ended up living there for nearly thirty years, but also translated the Chinese classics into English, allowing millions more people to learn and…

The Japanese-Canadian Internment – 75 Years After

Hosted by the Vancouver Historical Society, The Japanese-Canadian Internment – 75 Years After will take place on Sept. 28 at the Museum of Vancouver. The talk will feature Japanese-Canadian activists Mary Kitagawa and her partner Tosh. In 1896, Mary Kitagawa’s grandfather moved from the prefecture of Hiroshima to Canada. He would make up the first…

A bold vision of Reconciliation

Canada’s 150th birthday takes a solemn tone, juxtaposed against a festive atmosphere, as the country’s Indigenous people mourn the atrocities committed by the Canadian government. To reconcile, however, doesn’t mean to transform relationships with just the government. For Chief Robert Joseph, member of the Gwawaenuk First Nation and co-founder of Reconciliation Canada, reconciliation is a…

A community addresses issues of racism

“What do we do?” The need to answer that question is at the heart of an upcoming public forum where North Shore residents will have an opportunity to discuss their concerns relating to discrimination and racism. “Canada has often been touted as a successful experiment in multiculturalism. However, in light of recent events, such as…

Filling the gaps in World War I history

A local community historian wants to give people a more holistic perspective of World War One, particularly the Sikhs’ contribution. “My intent is to present the real inclusive history, not the one perpetuated in pop-culture and classrooms for that matter. It’s going to be a history lesson to fill in the blanks for the people…