The ancient art of chigiri-e

Taiwanese artist and pianist Leanne Lai celebrates Japanese culture and demonstrates passion, beauty and unwavering patience in her Chigiri-e Paper Art: Flowers exhibit and workshop, suitable for all ages. “I feel chigiri-e is important to me as it is so beautiful. Very few people know about this unique art form,” says Lai. “I have enjoyed…

True to Place inaugurates largest Indigenous art exhibition

A group of 10 emerging and established Northwest Coast Indigenous artists will exhibit their works encompassing a variety of styles and techniques at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art from June 15, 2022 to March 19, 2023. Curated by artist and muralist Xémontalót Carrielynn Victor (Stó:lō), the exhibition’s primary title is True to…

Famous Last Words – Poetry Slam: wit and word

Poetry and comedy are expertly blended in Simon Fraser University’s (SFU) Famous Last Words, where contestants push each other to their creative limits in a series of games designed to test artistic and comedic merit. On June 22 at Pyatt Hall at the VSO School of Music, Famous Last Words brings together a well-known, much loved group of…

Bodies in diaspora: Mere Phantoms’ shadow art highlights the refugee crisis

Playing with light and shadow, Surrey Art Gallery’s new exhibition Mere Phantoms: Shadows Without Borders is an interactive show that explores human displacement and memories of home. “One of the installations in the exhibition invites visitors to pick up custom flashlights and shine the light against tableaus of handmade paper-cut-out sculptures. The shadows from these…

Pass Over: A much-needed story

Antoinette Chinonye Nwandu has created a new and powerful play which merges the brutal realities that many people are living in with the classic play Waiting for Godot by playwrightSamuel Becket. In Pass Over, directed by Omari Newton, two young black men wait for a stranger and experience horrifying violence and other brutal realities on Chicago’s Southside while…

Humour permeates history play

In Yellow Fever, a play written by R.A. Shiomi, central character Sam Shikaze investigates the disappearance of the ‘Cherry Blossom Queen.’ The drama is set in the 1970s on Powell Street and highlights key issues such as racism and police corruption while keeping the audience engaged with comedic relief. Directed by Donna Spencer, the play is…

Whale songs mingle with soulful harmonies

Separation, both animal and human, from the natural world needs to be healed through musical connection, says Leah Abramson, singer-songwriter/composer of Songs For a Lost Pod. Using orca vocalizations as rhythmic beats, Abramson explores themes of interspecies communication, intergenerational trauma, and sorrow for a polluted planet. The show is imbued with compassion for orcas, who have…

Music to sustain perseverance and triumph

Pianist Ian Parker brings his classical talent, and a handful of musical friends, to the Kay Meek Centre for a Ukraine benefit concert on May 29. The performance features an assortment of classical music pieces from Bach, Saint-Saens, Brahms and Schumann, that were either composed or arranged for a more intimate chamber group. The net…

Hip-hop in the digital age

Curated by Mark V. Campbell, Still Tho: Aesthetic Survival in Hip-Hop’s Visual Art, an exhibition presented by the Canada Council for the Arts features artwork by 13 cross disciplinary artists from across the country, including from First Nations, Métis, and racialized communities. Still Tho features the work of visual artists from across Canada and beyond whose creativity…

Sharing stories, down the generations

Tsimshian artist and storyteller Roy Henry Vickers weaves a beautiful and simplistic tale inspired by his childhood in the Indigenous village of Kitkatla through Ben the Sea Lion, a children’s picture book that will also delight any age group. “My childhood outside of school was connected to nature. My work has always been influenced by…